A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

California Bill Wouldn’t Ban the Bible

Q: Is California considering legislation that would ban the Bible?

A: No. Online stories making that claim have misrepresented a bill that would outlaw the advertising and selling of “sexual orientation change efforts.”

FactChecking McCarthy’s Statistics

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy got some of his facts wrong about mandatory spending and the labor participation rate during a recent appearance on Fox Business.

Did the Polio Vaccine Cause Cancer?

Q: Did people develop cancer because of the polio vaccine?

A: There are no known cases, and it’s very unlikely. In the 1950s and 1960s, people did receive polio vaccines contaminated with a virus that causes cancer in rodents. But research suggests this virus doesn’t cause cancer in humans.

We’re a Webby Winner

The International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences has awarded FactCheck.org the 2018 Webby in the “News & Politics” category for websites.

Solar Hyperbole?

Three weeks after the Trump administration imposed a 30 percent tariff on imported solar energy cells and panels, the president claimed that “a lot of places are opening up” to “make solar panels again.” Two weeks later, he said that “we’re opening up at least five plants,” and by mid-April, the number had grown to “seven or eight.”

Players Guide 2018

Outside groups spent more than $1.6 billion in the 2016 election on TV ads and other forms of communication that urged the election or defeat of federal candidates, according to the Federal Election Commission. Today, we reintroduce our biennial feature on the groups that will now spend hundreds of millions more trying to influence the outcome of the 2018 elections.

Muddying a Trump Loyalty Test

In Republican primaries where loyalty to President Donald Trump’s agenda is a litmus test for many voters, the approval of a $1.3 trillion omnibus spending bill has become a political weapon — no matter how lawmakers voted.

Presidential Approval Numbers

On April 12 and 13, President Donald Trump’s approval rating, according to the Rasmussen Reports, was 50 percent. At the same point in Barack Obama’s presidency, Obama’s approval rating per Rasmussen was 48 percent and 49 percent. But Trump inaccurately described his poll number as “much higher than President Obama at the same point.”

Paul Ryan Misleads on Corporate Tax Revenues

House Speaker Paul Ryan misleadingly claimed that corporate tax revenues are “still rising,” even though the 2017 tax law cut tax rates. In the first six months of fiscal year 2018, corporate tax receipts have declined by 22.3 percent from a year ago. Revenues are also projected to be less over the next 10 years than they otherwise would have been because of the law.