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Whoppers of Campaign 2010

Midterm elections are an embarrassment of riches for fact-checkers — this year more than others. With Democrats fighting desperately to keep control of the House and Senate, and a torrent of money from corporations and other undisclosed …

FairTax, Washington Senate Race and Aqua Buddha

In episode 34 of our podcast, we talk about a popular — and misleading — line of attack from Democrats about the FairTax. Plus, we look at ads in the Washington Senate race and the controversial "Aqua Buddha" ad in the Kentucky contest.

For more on the stories discussed in this episode, see:
Sales Tax Spin Oct. 20
Toss-ups: Wayward Ads in Washington State Oct. 15
Conway ‘Lying’ About ‘Aqua Buddha’? Oct. 18

Sales Tax Spin

Democrats are running misleading ads in several House and Senate races accusing Republicans of supporting a “23 percent national sales tax.” The ads fail to mention that the proposed tax — while controversial — is designed to replace all federal income …

AFSCME’s Misleading Tax Attack

AFSCME, the big labor union, is running a misleading ad attacking one of the GOP’s premier House candidates. In an attempt to protect a vulnerable freshman Democrat, Rep. John Boccieri of Ohio, AFSCME badly misrepresents his Republican challenger’s stance on taxation. AFSCME’s ad …

The Whoppers of 2007

We review some notable political falsehoods and distortions of the year.

Unspinning the FairTax

Summary
In our recent article on the second GOP debate, we called out Gov. Mike Huckabee as well as Reps. Tom Tancredo and Duncan Hunter for their support of the FairTax. We wrote that the bipartisan Advisory Panel on Tax Reform had “calculated that a sales tax would have to be set at 34 percent of retail sales prices to bring in the same revenue as the taxes it would replace, meaning that an automobile with a retail price of $10,000 would cost $13,400 including the new sales tax.”

GOP Candidates Debate, Round 2

Summary

Claims, facts and figures flew at the second GOP presidential debate of 2008. Not all were true. For example:

Mitt Romney claimed he didn’t raise taxes when he was governor of Massachusetts, failing to note that he increased government fees by hundreds of millions of dollars and shifted some of the state tax burden to the local level.
Rep. Tom Tancredo of Colorado claimed scientific reports on whether humans are responsible for global warming are split 50-50,