A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

FactChecking Trump’s Iowa Rally

The 2020 presidential campaign is more than 1,200 days away, but President Donald Trump held yet another Make America Great Again rally — this time in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. And, as he did in past campaign speeches, Trump spoke for a long time and reeled off numerous false and misleading claims.

FactChecking Trump on Coal Jobs

FactCheck.org Deputy Managing Editor Robert Farley discusses President Donald Trump’s misleading boast that the opening of a new coal mine in Pennsylvania is proof that his administration is “putting the miners back to work.”

Trump’s Coal Spin

President Donald Trump touted the opening of a new coal mine in Pennsylvania as evidence that his administration is “putting the miners back to work.” But construction of the mine in question began before the 2016 election. And experts say it’s not evidence of a resurgence in coal mining.

Scott Pruitt and Coal Jobs

The Environmental Protection Agency head said that the “coal sector” added 7,000 jobs in May and “almost 50,000 jobs” since the fourth quarter of last year. But the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports an increase of just 400 coal mining jobs in May and 1,300 since December.

Trump on China, India and Coal

Trump wrongly claimed that the Paris Agreement would allow China to “build hundreds of additional coal plants” and allow India to “double its coal production by 2020” but the United States “can’t build the plants.”

The Candidates on Climate Change

We delve into the presidential candidates’ stances and claims on an issue that has received little attention in this campaign.

Groundhog Friday

At this stage of the campaign, we often hear similar claims repeated over and over in stump speeches.

GOP Convention, Day 2

The speakers went too far in their claims on guns, Benghazi, coal jobs, Keystone and more.

Obama’s Wind Energy Claim

In his State of the Union address, President Obama said, “in fields from Iowa to Texas, wind power is now cheaper than dirtier, conventional power.” That is true in some pockets of the country, but the national average for coal and gas prices is still less.