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California Shooting Prompts ‘Crisis Actor’ Conspiracy

Q: Was Susan Orfanos, the mother of a shooting victim in Thousand Oaks, California, also interviewed by news outlets after other mass shootings in 2016 and 2017?

A: No. A Facebook post misidentifies two other women as Orfanos.  

Sayoc Pictured with Soccer Teammate, Not Democratic Donor

Q: Was Cesar Sayoc, the man suspected of sending pipe bombs to high-profile liberals, photographed with “a Billionaire Democrat donor”?

A: No. The man in the photo with Sayoc is a retired soccer coach and his former teammate who has no record of any campaign donations.

Home Explosion Spawns Clinton Conspiracy Theory

Q: Were the victims of a New Jersey home explosion tied to an investigation into the Clinton Foundation?

A: No. A viral conspiracy theory is spreading that claim without any evidence. Investigators told us they “found no evidence of foul play” and that the deaths were ruled “accidental.”

Conspiracy Theory Follows Call For ‘Space Force’

Q: Did President Donald Trump call for the creation of a “space force” to fight off an “alien attack”?

A: No. The president did request exploration of a “space force,” but it is unrelated to extraterrestrial activity.

No Evidence of Tucson ‘Child Sex Camp’

Q: Was a recently discovered encampment in Arizona used as a “child rape camp”?

A: There is no evidence to support that claim. Authorities say their investigation revealed no such criminal activity.

No Evidence of ‘Horrific’ Clinton Video

Q: Did a video of Hillary Clinton and Huma Abedin assaulting a young girl surface online?

A: No. A story making that claim suggests the New York City Police Department is investigating Clinton and Abedin. That’s false.

Explaining Conspiracy Theories

FactCheck.org staff writer Saranac Hale Spencer appeared on The Colin McEnroe Show on WNPR, a Connecticut public radio station, to talk about the conspiracy theories and misinformation that spread online after the deadly shooting on Feb. 14 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida.

Sandy Hook Hoax Revisited

Q: Are the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting actually alive?

A: No. That is a claim made by conspiracy theorists who believe the shooting never happened.

Phony Yearbook Photo

Q: Is David Hogg pictured in a California school yearbook?

A: No. That’s a yearbook photo from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, where Hogg is a student.