A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

Schumer Exaggerates Proposed Defense Cuts

Democratic Sen. Charles E. Schumer of New York exaggerated Defense Secretary Robert Gates’ plan to cut military spending during an exchange with Bob Schieffer on “Face the Nation.”
Schumer criticized a group of conservative Republicans for proposing a bill to cut non-defense federal spending by $2.5 trillion through fiscal year 2021:

Schumer, Jan. 23: But for instance, they leave the military totally out. … But everyone knows there’s waste and inefficiency in the military budget. Defense Secretary Gates has proposed cutting a hundred fifty billion dollars out of it.

Pesky Proper Nouns

Out on the campaign trail, John McCain has been criticizing Barack Obama for proposing cuts in defense spending. But his criticism relies on a potentially misleading quote. And we found that McCain is dinging Obama for reducing spending on a program that McCain plans to eliminate entirely.
CNN and MSNBC both report that McCain told supporters in Lee’s Summit, Mo., that:

McCain, Sept. 8: …during the primary he told a liberal advocacy group that he’d cut defense spending by tens of billions of dollars.

Democratic Debate Part 3

We caught a few candidates off base at the third debate among Democratic contenders for the 2008 presidential nomination.

Context Goes AWOL in Tennessee

Tennessee Senate Candidate Bob Corker joined forces with the NRSC to produce an ad asking Tennessee voters who Democratic Representative Harold Ford, Jr. is “kidding” on national security.

The Whoppers of 2004

Bush and Kerry repeat discredited claims in their final flurry of ads. Here’s our pre-election summary of the misinformation we found during the Bush-Kerry presidential campaign.

The “Willie Horton” Ad Of 2004?

Republican group’s ad shows Osama, Kerry. It appeals to fear, and twists Kerry’s record on defense, intelligence, Iraq.

Anti-Kerry Ad Misses Context, Distorts Facts

An ad by the pro-Bush Progress for America Voter Fund (PFA) attacks Kerry for voting against intelligence spending and for voting against “13 weapons systems our troops depend on.” The ad is partly accurate, but misleads by starving the facts of context.