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Student Loan Stretching

Arkansas Rep. Tom Cotton mischaracterizes the Affordable Care Act’s impact on student loans, and a teachers union stretches Cotton’s voting record on the issue.

FactChecking the North Carolina Senate Race

The North Carolina Senate race pits incumbent Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan against Republican challenger Thom Tillis. While the two campaigns have aggressively attacked each another, they’ve had a lot of help from outside supporters as well.

Tillis: Education Budget Backer or Hacker?

A North Carolina public school teacher says in a TV ad that she tells her students to “start with the facts,” but she begins attacking Republican Senate candidate Thom Tillis with an exaggerated claim about Tillis’ education “cuts.”

Childish Georgia Ads

TV ads in Georgia’s GOP Senate primary have taken a childish turn. Ads depicting his opponents as crying babies have helped businessman David Perdue take a lead in polls. Now Rep. Jack Kingston’s ad likens Perdue to an infant with a stinking diaper.

Obama on Education Investments

President Obama says public investment in schools was “allowed to wither” as a result of the “trickle-down ideology” of recent decades. There’s no clear trend for public spending on education as a percentage of the U.S. economy, but public investment hasn’t withered.

Jeb Bush Gets ‘F’ on School Spending

Jeb Bush has repeatedly — and falsely — claimed that the United States spends “more per student than any country in the world.” Luxembourg, Norway and Switzerland all spend more than the U.S. on elementary and secondary education.

Sequester Spin

The Sunday talk shows included exaggerated claims from both sides about the debate over automatic spending cuts scheduled to take effect March 1:

Education Secretary Arne Duncan said “as many as 40,000 teachers could lose their jobs.” But that assumes the entire $2.8 billion in looming DOE cuts would come from teacher salaries. Duncan himself testified there would be cuts elsewhere — including cutting “more than 70,000 students from grant and work study programs”