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A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

In Viral Video, Doctor Falsely Touts Hydroxychloroquine as COVID-19 ‘Cure’

In Viral Video, Doctor Falsely Touts Hydroxychloroquine as COVID-19 ‘Cure’

A widely shared video, featuring a doctor falsely claiming hydroxychloroquine is a “cure” for COVID-19, ignited an online storm that resulted in the video being pulled by social media platforms. There is no known cure for COVID-19, and current scientific evidence hasn’t found that hydroxychloroquine is an effective treatment.

Navarro Doesn’t Give Full Picture On Hydroxychloroquine

Navarro Doesn’t Give Full Picture On Hydroxychloroquine

White House trade adviser Peter Navarro has promoted the “astonishing” results of an observational study that found hydroxychloroquine was associated with lower mortality for patients hospitalized for COVID-19. But the study has limitations, and multiple randomized controlled trials have found the drug is not beneficial to hospitalized patients.

Azar, Trump Mislead on FDA’s Hydroxychloroquine Decision

Azar, Trump Mislead on FDA’s Hydroxychloroquine Decision

At the White House, the Health and Human Services secretary left the misleading impression that the FDA’s decision to revoke its emergency use authorization of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine for COVID-19 “removes a potential barrier” and makes it easier to access the drugs. The FDA’s action does the opposite.

Meme Misrepresents Fauci’s Position on Vaccine Trials

Meme Misrepresents Fauci’s Position on Vaccine Trials

A viral meme falsely suggests Dr. Anthony Fauci supports administering a COVID-19 vaccine before clinical trials are completed. Fauci supports the manufacture of vaccines while trials are underway — but only administering the vaccine once the trials are over and it is deemed effective and safe.

The Falsehoods of the ‘Plandemic’ Video

The Falsehoods of the ‘Plandemic’ Video

The first installment of a documentary called “Plandemic” stormed through social media this week. But the viral video weaves a grand conspiracy theory by using a host of false and misleading claims about the novel coronavirus pandemic and its origins, vaccines, treatments for COVID-19, and more.

An April Filled with Repeats

An April Filled with Repeats

The president has used the coronavirus briefings to repeatedly misstate the facts about his administration’s handling of the pandemic, the economy and trade with China.

Trump’s Faulty Malaria-Coronavirus Connection

Trump’s Faulty Malaria-Coronavirus Connection

Falsely citing “studies,” President Donald Trump has suggested that there are few novel coronavirus cases in “malaria countries” because of the use of the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine. But no such studies exist, and the drug is not widely used for malaria in much of the world.

Trump’s False Coronavirus Claim About Lupus Patients

Trump’s False Coronavirus Claim About Lupus Patients

President Donald Trump once again touted hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus. This time, the president falsely claimed that “people with lupus” who take hydroxychloroquine “aren’t catching this horrible virus.”