A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

Boehner vs. Castro on the Exchange

House Speaker John Boehner says his premiums will double, and his deductible will triple, under the Affordable Care Act. That’s true, but it is misleading to compare Boehner with the “many Americans seeing their costs go up,” as his spokesman Brendan Buck has put it.

Free Gas For Low-Income Americans?

Q: Is it true that Obamacare provides for opening “free gasoline” service stations for low-income people?
A: No. This rumor was started by a satirical news story.

The Keg Stand Obamacare Ads

Let’s clear this up: The edgy “got insurance?” Obamacare ads that have gone viral on the Web were not created by the Colorado state exchange or any other governmental agency, nor are they taxpayer-funded, as two Republican congressmen have claimed.

ObamaCare by the Numbers

The Republican National Committee claims that 8.2 million Americans can’t find full-time jobs “partly due to ObamaCare.” But that figure is the total number of part-time workers in the U.S. seeking full-time work.

False Assumptions on the Health Care Law

An ad from a conservative group attacks the health care law by asking misleading and loaded questions about its impact. The ad features a mother named Julie, who asks, “If we can’t pick our own doctor, how do I know my family’s going to get the care they need?”

GOP Budget Revives ‘Obamacare’ Claims

The release of the House GOP budget by Rep. Paul Ryan has sparked a resurgence of false and misleading claims about the Affordable Care Act, which the budget seeks to largely repeal. On the Sunday talk shows, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the head of the Democratic National Committee, and Sen. Ron Johnson, a Republican from Wisconsin, each distorted the facts regarding revenues raised in the health care law. And Ryan wrongly said the law would take money away from Medicare and ration benefits for seniors.

‘Obamacare’ to cost $20,000 a Family?

Q: Did the IRS say that the cheapest health insurance plan under the federal health care law would cost $20,000 per family?
A: No. The IRS used $20,000 in a hypothetical example to illustrate how it will calculate the tax penalty for a family that fails to obtain health coverage as required by law. Treasury says the figure “is not an estimate of premiums.”