A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center
FactCheck.org is celebrating 15 years of holding politicians accountable.

Selective Edits on Interrogation?

On May 21, President Barack Obama and former Vice President Dick Cheney both gave speeches on national security, specifically focusing on Guantanamo Bay, detainees and interrogation techniques. We combed through the transcripts of both and found a few items worth mentioning from Cheney’s speech.
In defending so-called enhanced interrogation techniques, Cheney quoted Obama’s director of national intelligence, Adm. Dennis C. Blair, as saying that "high value information came from interrogations in which those methods were used and provided a deeper understanding of the al Qaeda organization that was attacking this country."

Cheney’s Gitmo Recidivism Claims

Former Vice President Dick Cheney used his May 10 appearance on CBS’ "Face the Nation" to, once again, strongly defend the Bush administration’s handling of alleged terrorists taken into U.S. custody. At one point, to back up his characterization of Guantanamo Bay detainees as ultra-bad guys, Cheney claimed that detainees sent home from Gitmo had already demonstrated significant recidivism: "We released hundreds already of the less threatening types. About 12 percent of them, nonetheless, went back into the fight as terrorists."

The Whoppers Of 2006

The mid-term elections of 2006 brought an unprecedented barrage of advertising containing much that is false or misleading.

New RNC Web Ad Blurs History

Another video on homeland security twists Democrats’ words and exaggerates “the Republican record.”

Distortion and Insinuation in Ohio

An ad by Republican Sen. Mike DeWine of Ohio distorts his opponent’s record by selectively choosing votes that don’t accurately reflect the overall picture.

We Need A Fence?

TV ads say “easy immigration from Mexico” provides cover for terrorists. But the 9/11 hijackers had visas. And what about Canada?

The Whoppers of 2004

Bush and Kerry repeat discredited claims in their final flurry of ads. Here’s our pre-election summary of the misinformation we found during the Bush-Kerry presidential campaign.