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Kentucky Governor Misguides on Chickenpox

In the midst of a chickenpox outbreak in his state, Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin said that he had not vaccinated any of his children against the disease, choosing instead to purposely expose his kids to an infected person to get the chickenpox — a practice that public health officials say is dangerous.

Darla Shine’s Measles Misinformation

Over a nearly 18-hour Twitter spree, Darla Shine, the wife of Bill Shine, President Donald Trump’s deputy chief of staff for communications, made a series of false and misleading statements about measles and vaccines.

Rep.-elect Green Wrong About Vaccines, CDC Fraud

At a town hall event on Dec. 11, Rep.-elect Mark Green of Tennessee inaccurately claimed that vaccine preservatives might cause autism. He also repeated an unsubstantiated claim that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “fraudulently managed” data that showed a link between vaccinations and autism.

Did the Polio Vaccine Cause Cancer?

Q: Did people develop cancer because of the polio vaccine?

A: There are no known cases, and it’s very unlikely. In the 1950s and 1960s, people did receive polio vaccines contaminated with a virus that causes cancer in rodents. But research suggests this virus doesn’t cause cancer in humans.

Debunking False Vaccine Claim

Q: Has the Food and Drug Administration announced that vaccines cause autism?

A: No. FDA statements are grounded in scientific evidence. There is no evidence that vaccination is linked to autism.

Scientific Evidence and the EU Court

A European Union court decision about vaccines raises interesting two scientific questions: How do scientists decide whether vaccines can cause conditions such as multiple sclerosis. And how certain can they be about their conclusions?

Fiorina’s Fuzzy Vaccine Claims

Carly Fiorina said some unnamed vaccine-preventable diseases are “not communicable” and “not contagious.” Every immunization recommended by the CDC covers a highly communicable disease.