A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

Another Bogus Parkland Conspiracy Theory

Q: Does searching an obituary website prove that there were no shooting deaths at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14?

A: No. A website falsely suggests that there were no deaths because the victims’ obituaries couldn’t be found on one particular site.

Hyped Headline Turns Paint Into Terror

Q: Was the first family attacked by a terrorist during the Easter holiday weekend?

A: No. That’s a misrepresentation of an act of vandalism at Trump International Golf Club.

David Hogg at School During Parkland Shooting

Q: Was David Hogg at home during the February school shooting in Florida?

A: No. Hogg recorded videos from inside the school during the shooting and a teacher confirmed that he was there at the time. 

Video: Gun Violence

In this video, CNN’s Jake Tapper reviews claims made by members of both parties about gun violence in the U.S. 

Explaining Conspiracy Theories

FactCheck.org staff writer Saranac Hale Spencer appeared on The Colin McEnroe Show on WNPR, a Connecticut public radio station, to talk about the conspiracy theories and misinformation that spread online after the deadly shooting on Feb. 14 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida.

Phony Yearbook Photo

Q: Is David Hogg pictured in a California school yearbook?

A: No. That’s a yearbook photo from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, where Hogg is a student.

No ‘Crisis Actors’ in Parkland, Florida

Q: Are the students who survived the Florida school shooting really “crisis actors”?

A: No. Conspiracy theories have been spreading online to undercut students advocating stricter gun control.

Out With the ‘Old Dixie’

Q: Did President Donald Trump order the removal of Barack Obama’s name from a Florida highway?

A: No. That rumor comes from a false headline attached to a 2015 opinion piece critical of the name change.