A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

Obamacare for the Mortgage Industry?

A slate of new ads from the 60 Plus Association evoke a well-worn conservative punching bag — “Obamacare” — to attack seven senators for supporting a lesser-known plan to overhaul the housing finance market.

Misusing Our Name in Virginia

Attention Virginia voters: FactCheck.org has not previously written about House of Delegates candidates Robert Farinholt or Monty Mason. No matter what TV ads, robocalls and campaign mailers say.

Misrepresenting McAuliffe’s Budget Plan

Three new ads — two from the Ken Cuccinelli campaign and another from a super PAC that supports him — claim Terry McAuliffe’s budget plan would increase spending by $14 billion and that he would raise taxes on the typical family by $1,700 to pay for it.

More (Mostly Accurate) Virginia Attacks

Virginia Democrat Terry McAuliffe’s latest ad says Republican Ken Cuccinelli “twists the facts” by saying McAuliffe made millions from a company that went bankrupt, leaving thousands of workers unemployed and with worthless pension funds.

Crossroads Colors Kaine’s Cuts

Two ads from Crossroads GPS paint incomplete and misleading pictures of Tim Kaine’s support for cutting education and defense spending.

One ad says that “when Tim Kaine proposed harsh funding cuts for Virginia schools, one Democrat called it ‘a kick in the teeth.’ ” It’s true that the top official in one wealthy county did that — when the then-Virginia governor proposed a one-year delay to a scheduled change that would have prevented cuts for two-thirds of the state’s poorest school districts.

McDonnell’s Distorted Attack

Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Bob McDonnell’s new ad claims that Democrat Creigh Deeds’ policies would bring $7,800 in higher taxes over four years for Virginia households. The ad would be devastating, if it were true.

Fuel for Frustration
Deeds has never proposed a "billion dollar gas tax increase," as the ad claims. It’s true that many transportation experts and legislators in Virginia have said that an additional $1 billion per year is needed to widen highways,

McDonnell Ad Cites Praise, Leaves Out Criticism

More on that governor’s race in Virginia: Bob McDonnell, the GOP candidate and the former state attorney general, is running an ad that’s meant to bathe his "comprehensive transportation plan" in a warm glow. Ironically, though, the ad’s only reference for its claims is an editorial from the Washington Post in July that devotes far more space to criticizing McDonnell’s plan than to praising it.

Part of the ad – the portion that cites the Post‘s critique of state Sen.

Dueling Ads in Virginia Race, Part 2

Last week, we wrote about a TV ad from Virginia state Sen. Creigh Deeds, the Democratic candidate to be the state’s governor, which misleadingly described his opponent’s role in utility rate increases over the last few years. Deeds’ Republican challenger, former Virginia Attorney General Bob McDonnell, responded with a misleading ad of his own.

The ad turns the tables on Deeds, saying that he "supports Washington’s cap and trade energy scheme that will dramatically increase utility rates for families and kill 56,000 coal and manufacturing jobs."

Dueling Ads in Virginia Race

A TV ad from Virginia state Sen. Creigh Deeds, who’s running on the Democratic ticket in one of the nation’s two gubernatorial races this year, misleadingly describes his opponent’s role in utility rate increases over the last several years.
The Deeds campaign’s ad, "Power," asks viewers, "In tough times, what kind of politician sides with Appalachian Power?" The answer is "Bob McDonnell," according to the ad’s narrator. According to the narrator, McDonnell, the former state attorney general and GOP candidate,

Virginia Unemployment Clarification

In our article "Virginia Myths and More," we wrote that some of the federal stimulus money available to Virginia came with a requirement to change the state’s unemployment eligibility rules to give "benefits to part-time workers for the first time." However, an alert reader who works at the Virginia Employment Commission told us that the state has always extended unemployment benefits to part-time workers. We checked in with the VEC, and our article could use some clarification.