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A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center
SciCheck’s COVID-19/Vaccination Project

Spoof Video Furthers Microchip Conspiracy Theory

Spoof Video Furthers Microchip Conspiracy Theory

A list of the ingredients used in COVID-19 vaccines is publicly available, and the ingredients don’t include microchips. Yet claims advancing conspiracy theories that they do continue to flourish. A recent video purports to show a microchip reader for pets detecting a chip in a vaccinated person’s arm — but the original video was created as a joke.

Vaccine Ingredient SM-102 Is Safe

Vaccine Ingredient SM-102 Is Safe

The COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna uses an ingredient called SM-102 to deliver the mRNA that carries instructions for how to develop antibodies against the novel coronavirus. A widely shared video is now spreading the falsehood that SM-102 is harmful, but the warning label it shows is for chloroform, not SM-102.

Magnet Videos Refuel Bogus Claim of Vaccine Microchips

Magnet Videos Refuel Bogus Claim of Vaccine Microchips

The ingredients in the COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the U.S. are publicly available. Yet a false claim that the vaccines contain microchips is receiving renewed attention through a spate of videos of people claiming that magnets stick to their arms after vaccination. Experts say none of the ingredients would cause this supposed effect.

How do we know what ingredients are in a vaccine?

The full ingredient list for any authorized COVID-19 vaccine can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website and in a variety of documents on the Food and Drug Administration’s website, including in a fact sheet for vaccine recipients that’s available in numerous languages. 
Both the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines contain messenger RNA, or mRNA;

A Guide to Moderna’s COVID-19 Vaccine

A Guide to Moderna’s COVID-19 Vaccine

Moderna’s mRNA vaccine is the second COVID-19 vaccine authorized for use in the U.S. Here, we give a rundown of basic facts about the vaccine and an overview of how it works.

Q&A on COVID-19 Vaccines

Q&A on COVID-19 Vaccines

Three COVID-19 vaccines are now authorized in the U.S. In this story, we answer some common questions about the shots.

COVID-19 Vaccines Don’t Have Patient-Tracking Devices

COVID-19 Vaccines Don’t Have Patient-Tracking Devices

A video circulating on social media falsely claims that vaccines for COVID-19 have a microchip that “tracks the location of the patient.” The chip, which is not currently in use, would be attached to the end of a plastic vial and provide information only about the vaccine dose. It cannot track people.