A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

NRA’s Ominous But Misleading Appeal

A series of NRA ads employ images of an intruder breaking into the home of a mother home alone with her baby to make the case that Democratic candidates have “voted to take away your gun rights.” But the implication of the jarring imagery goes far beyond the facts.

Midterm Medicare Mudslinging

Democrats, Republicans spend nearly $50 million on TV ads that repeat old, scary Medicare claims.

Settling the Dust in Arkansas

Arkansas Sen. Mark Pryor tries to make political hay out of agricultural dust by distorting the facts in a new TV ad, while Republicans manufacture a bogus jobs claim against the Democratic senator.

FactChecking the Arkansas Senate Race

The Arkansas Senate race between Democratic Sen. Mark Pryor and Republican Rep. Tom Cotton began for us in June 2013 — just six months into the new Congress — with an article that carried the headline “It’s Groundhog Day for Fact-Checkers.” It hasn’t gotten much better for fact-checkers since then.

Hijacking History in Arkansas

In a new TV ad, Rep. Tom Cotton tries to rewrite history with the claim that President Obama “hijacked the farm bill, turned it into a food stamp bill.” Food stamp funding has been part of farm bills going back to 1973.

Pryor’s Prior Partisan Votes

Tom Cotton accuses Sen. Mark Pryor of “toeing the line” for President Obama and the Democratic Party, but Pryor voted against Obama more than any other Senate Democrat.

More Weak Claims on Cotton’s Insurance Ties

Another liberal group is attacking Republican Rep. Tom Cotton in Arkansas by saying Cotton has experience in the insurance industry and is attempting to undermine Medicare. Cotton’s insurance experience is limited to consulting work for a federal agency.

Disconnecting the Dots in Arkansas

A TV ad says Rep. Tom Cotton was “paid handsomely working for insurance companies” and wants to transform Medicare in ways that would benefit the industry at the expense of seniors. But there’s no evidence Cotton did work for insurers.