A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

The Facts on Trump’s EPA Nominee

Scott Pruitt, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee to head the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, has made some questionable claims related to global warming, fracking and the Clean Power Plan.

More False Claims About Fracking

The head of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee falsely claimed that a new report “confirms” that “hydraulic fracturing has not impacted drinking water” in Wyoming. The report said it could not reach “firm conclusions.”

Trump on Climate Change

President-elect Donald Trump told the New York Times he had an “open mind” about climate change, but he went on to repeat some of the same false and misleading claims that have been used by those who reject mainstream climate science.

Pence’s Stance on Climate Change

Tim Kaine has misrepresented Mike Pence’s current stance on climate change, making it a regular talking point in his campaign speeches.

The Candidates on Climate Change

We delve into the presidential candidates’ stances and claims on an issue that has received little attention in this campaign.

To Be or Not to Be a Wolf

Rep. Debbie Dingell claimed “the science is clear” that red wolves are not “hybrids” between coyotes and gray wolves. But the science is not clear.

Does Zika Cause Blindness?

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid claimed that Zika “affects everyone” — not just pregnant women and their babies — because recent research found that it “causes people to go blind.” That’s false.

John McCain’s Life Expectancy

Sen. John McCain’s primary opponent implied that if reelected, McCain may not live long enough to fulfill another six-year term. Actually, the odds are in his favor.

Stein Over the Top on Sea Level Rise

Green party presidential candidate Jill Stein cherry-picked the findings of a disputed study when she claimed that global warming would cause sea levels to rise on average “not one yard but many yards” in as soon as 50 years.

Unpacking Pot’s Impact in Colorado

Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson said “marijuana-related” traffic deaths, hospital visits and school suspensions in Colorado have “not significantly” increased since the state legalized the drug. That’s inaccurate.