A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

Trump’s 100-Day Boasts

President Donald Trump did a flurry of TV interviews and held a campaign-style rally to mark his first 100 days, and he left a trail of false, misleading and sometimes puzzling statements in his wake.

‘100-Day Action Plan’ Scorecard

As a candidate, Donald Trump issued a “100-day action plan to Make America Great Again.” He has kept some of those promises, broken a few, and many are still a work in progress.

The U.S.-Canada Dairy Dispute

President Donald Trump has said that what Canada has “done to our dairy farm workers is a disgrace” and that “dairy farmers in Wisconsin and upstate New York … are getting killed by NAFTA.” But that trade agreement isn’t what’s hurting farmers in the current dispute.

Trump Spins His First 100 Days

In an interview with the AP, the president stretched the facts on China, his border wall and job creation.

Trump’s MS-13 Miss

President Donald Trump blamed the Obama administration for allowing “bad MS 13 gangs to form in cities across U.S.” due to “weak illegal immigration policies.” The MS-13 gang was formed in Los Angeles in the 1980s and had spread across the country years before Barack Obama was elected president.

Hitler and Chemical Weapons

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer has apologized profusely for his much-criticized comparison of Syria’s Bashar Assad to Adolf Hitler, but his clarification that he meant Hitler did not drop chemical bombs from airplanes requires some historical context.

Trump’s Line on Syria

President Donald Trump said the Obama administration “had a great opportunity to solve” the crisis in Syria when Obama set a “red line” for military intervention. But when Obama didn’t launch such intervention, “I think that set us back a long ways,” Trump said. However, Trump ignores his repeated calls at the time to “not attack Syria.”

Medicaid’s Doctor Participation Rates

It’s a common criticism of the Medicaid program — that the doctor participation rate is lower than the rate for Medicare or private insurance. The implication is that Medicaid patients cannot access care, and it has gotten worse under the ACA. But experts say that’s misleading.

Price’s Grand Pronouncement

Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price claimed that under the GOP health care plan, “I firmly believe that nobody will be worse off financially.” But there are plenty of reasons to doubt that.

Spinning the CBO Report

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office’s analysis of the Republican health care bill has been released — so let the spinning begin.