A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

Republican Health Care Spin

Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price and House Speaker Paul Ryan engaged in partisan spin in talking about the Republican health care bill that was passed by the House last week.

Video: Trump’s Tax Plan

CNN’s Jake Tapper and FactCheck.org look at President Donald Trump’s statement that he will “end up paying more than I pay right now” under his tax-cut proposal.

Clinton Wrong on Debate Claim

Hillary Clinton, who declared that she is “now back to being an activist citizen and part of the resistance,” falsely claimed that no debate moderator ever asked Donald Trump, “how are you going to create more jobs”? It was asked in two of the three debates.

Trump’s 100-Day Boasts

President Donald Trump did a flurry of TV interviews and held a campaign-style rally to mark his first 100 days, and he left a trail of false, misleading and sometimes puzzling statements in his wake.

‘100-Day Action Plan’ Scorecard

As a candidate, Donald Trump issued a “100-day action plan to Make America Great Again.” He has kept some of those promises, broken a few, and many are still a work in progress.

Trump Spins His First 100 Days

In an interview with the AP, the president stretched the facts on China, his border wall and job creation.

Spinning Georgia’s Election Results

No candidate received 50 percent of the vote in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District special election, so the top two vote-getters now face off in a June 20 runoff. Nevertheless, both parties claimed a moral victory — spinning the facts to make their points.

Trump Distorts Ossoff’s Record

On the morning of the special House election in Georgia, President Trump fired off two tweets that were critical of Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff. Trump claimed Ossoff “will raise your taxes,” but we could find no evidence of Ossoff proposing any broad-based tax increases.

Sanders Wrong on Voter Turnout

Sen. Bernie Sanders wrongly claimed that voter turnout in 2016 was “the lowest … in 20 years.” In fact, turnout was higher than it was in 2012.

Gorsuch’s ‘Mainstream’ Measurement

Supporters of Judge Neil Gorsuch’s Supreme Court nomination describe him as a “mainstream judge.” Their evidence: He has voted nearly 99 percent with the majority on the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, and 97 percent of the court’s rulings were unanimous. But what do those statistics tell us? Not much.