A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center

Trump Jumps the Gun (Again) on Health Plans

President Donald Trump touted “record business” for new health insurance plans under a federal rule that hasn’t yet gone into effect. In fact, since at least December 2017, he has periodically, and prematurely, boasted that “millions” of people are already signing up for these association health plans.

Kavanaugh and the Preexisting Conditions Debate

An ad from a Democratic group warned that the president’s Supreme Court nominee could eliminate preexisting condition protections under the Affordable Care Act, a move that “would take us back to a time when insurance companies could deny you coverage.” But that depends on who “you” are.

Trump on Health Insurance Costs

President Donald Trump boasted that “we’re having tremendous plans coming out now — health care plans — at a fraction of the cost that are much better than Obamacare.” No such cheap plans have come out yet, though the administration has proposed rules that would expand the sale of less expensive insurance with fewer benefits.

Trump’s Numbers

Statistical measures of the president’s term to date.

Cotton’s False Insurance Assurance

Republican Sen. Tom Cotton falsely claimed that the amended Senate tax bill eliminating the penalty for not buying health insurance would have “no impact on anyone” who buys coverage through the exchanges established by the Affordable Care Act.

Trump Misleads on Insurer Profits

President Donald Trump has claimed that under the Affordable Care Act, insurance companies have “taken advantage of this country” and “made a fortune,” which he “stopped” by ending payments for cost-sharing subsidies on the ACA marketplaces. That’s misleading, at best, for several reasons.

Groundhog Friday: Trump Edition

President Donald Trump repeated some misleading claims this week as he made the rounds on conservative radio talk shows, delivered a speech to a conservative group and held a press conference with the Senate Republican leader.

Obama’s Final Numbers

The numbers are nearly all in now. What they show about what really happened during the eight years that Barack Obama was president is sometimes different from what politicians claimed.